The First Triumvirate's Facebook Feud

The First Triumvirate had its fair share of infamy, one known to be more established than his counterparts. We had decided that satirizing the political tensions and threats they posed to one another would prove to be a thoroughly entertaining read. Moreover, there were positive/mutually beneficial times when they celebrated one another's achievements and attained elevated statuses through political unions, for instance via marriage. We did feel that highlighting their tumultuous relationships until the disintegration of this elite 'crew' of leaders and that being delivered through a casual and relatable manner would make learning their history with light-hearted pleasure possible. The following are facebook profiles of each member belonging to The First Triumvirate. They include interactions with one another with explicit attacks via social media(similar to what we are guilty of today) included. The feud is made funny and obvious through such means.

Gnaeus Pompey Magnus

Marcus Licinius Crassus

Gaius Julius Caesar

 

 

REFERENCES - Images, Facts, Intepretations

Battle of Pharsalus :  http://www.livius.org/articles/battle/pharsalus-48-bce/

Battle of Pharsalus, Brittanica :  http://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-Pharsalus

Battle of Pharsalus as an event in History :  http://www.historynet.com/caesars-civil-war-battle-of-pharsalus.htm

Triumvirate, definition and function :  http://www.livius.org/articles/concept/triumvir/first-triumvirate/

Crassus, Biography :  http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/people/a/crassus.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commentarii_de_Bello_Civili

http://www.biography.com/people/julius-caesar-9192504

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/12193529/The-Ides-of-March-The-assassination-of-Julius-Caesar-and-how-it-changed-the-world.html

http://spartacus.wikia.com/wiki/Marcus_Licinius_Crassus

http://shortbiography.org/marcus-licinius-crassus.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Triumvirate

http://ancientrome.ru/art/artworken/img.htm?id=3263

http://www.romeacrosseurope.com/?p=1019

Goldsworthy, p. UNKNOWN; "Although Pompey and Crassus had combined to seek office and cooperated in the restoration of the tribunate, their mutual dislike and envy swiftly resurfaced.

Goldsworthy, p. 167; "A commission would oversee the purchase and distribution of the land to both Pompey's veteran soldiers and large numbers of the urban poor."

Boak, History of Rome to 565 A.D., pg. 169.

Cicero, Letters to his brother Quintus, see 2.3, accessed UNKNOWN.